Slicing the pie

From time to time we will post some background story in this blog about an object in our collection.

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Today we want to put another map from our collection in the spotlights. This school map from the 1920’s shows the different churches spreading the christian evangelism throughout the Dutch East Indies. Many churches spent time and resources on teaching and preaching in the colonies. Nowadays churches would probably think twice before marking a territory their own, but in the early twentieth century young missionaries in training were probably very content with this map. It clearly shows which group preached in each area and also lets you see the still unmarked territories, maybe offering prospect for the missionaries in the making.

Aside from the interesting map, the author is also worth mentioning. Not a cartologist, but a theologian was responsible for this overview. Born on the island of Sulawesi in 1875, A.M. Brouwer probably seen some parts of this map during his life. At a young age he moved to the Netherlands and later on became a minister and a professor in Theology at the University of Utrecht. Besides teaching young missionaries at the university, he also worked on a new Bible translation which was finished after his death in 1948. With this new translation came a few maps from Brouwer, about the travels of Paul the Apostle and the old kingdoms of Israel and Judea.

If you want a closer look at the map you can also go to the KITLV viewer.

A geography of maps

From time to time we will post some background story in this blog about an object in our collection.

IndonesiëStippen

An interesting visualization tool of the results of our georeferencing project is the so-called ‘Map Finder’: a Google world map on which all georeferenced maps are indicated with a red dot. This tool shows the spatial distribution of these maps. You can see it on the ‘Results’-tab of this blog.
We have to make some reservations with the interpretation of the pattern. Only a part of the maps is already georeferenced, only a part of the KITLV collection is digitally available, and only a part (although an important one) of all produced maps of the Dutch East Indies are kept in the KITLV collection. Nevertheless, the maps that are georeferenced up to now, can be considered as a random sample of late 19th and early 20th century maps of Indonesia. Therefore , the distribution pattern provides insight into the geographical variation in mapping intensity throughout the former Dutch colony.

The most striking is the mapping density on the island of Java. Clearly, this island was the center of the Dutch East Indies, with the capital of Batavia/Jakarta and other major cities as Bandung, Semarang and Surabaya. Moreover, Java is the most populated island of Indonesia. The island of Sumatra is in second place. Here, there seem to be some clusters around some of the major cities: Banda Aceh, Medan and Padang and surprisingly Bangka Island. The other islands are mapped less intensively, with only a clear cluster of maps in Southwest-Sulawesi around Makassar.

In general, it can be concluded that there is a correlation between the mapping density and the population density of Indonesia. Even more, the dot pattern matches with the coverage of the Dutch topographical map series of Indonesia. The most dense areas are more the same as those that are covered by the large-scale topographical map series.

Tutorial on difficult and advanced maps

For anyone experiencing problems with the difficult maps in our collection, please visit the tutorial page for our new tutorial on advanced maps. We made a list of several overview maps in map series which are difficult to georeference. We hope this helps you with finding more reference points in these 19th century maps. Please leave a comment with any request on how we can help you with the georeferencing process.

http://blogs.library.leiden.edu/mapsinthecrowd/tutorial/

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Status report: 8% has been georeferenced

We’re shifting gears with Maps in the Crowd. Over 500 maps are now georeferenced, meaning that 8% has been done. With an ever shifting top ten, it’s exciting to see that many contributors are working hard to reference our collection of old maps. In the coming days we will inform you about a part of our collection that you are currently working on. You can expect a few blogposts about some interesting maps and a short movie to invite even more people to join our project.

Again, keep up the good work!

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And we’re off!

The Leiden Georeferencer is open for business! Over 7000 maps await you…

Contribute to the progress of academic research by joining our geocrowdsourcing project of old maps from our Special Collections. The most active contributors will gain a spot in our library ‘Hall of Fame’ and will be rewarded with a special price.

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The wait is over! New maps available on February 11 at noon

We’ve completed our preparations and are happy to announce the launch of the renewed Leiden Georeferencer! As from February 11th (noon) you’ll be able to geotag over 7000 maps from the KITLV heritage collection (the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Carribean Studies).Georeferencing at Leiden University

Contribute to the progress of academic research by joining our geocrowdsourcing project of old maps from our Special Collections. The most active contributors will gain a spot in our library ‘Hall of Fame’ and will be rewarded with a special price. Read all about it on this blog.

New maps available shortly!

Currently, we’re preparing a large new set of maps to include in our Leiden Georeferencer tool. This consist of 7620 maps from the KITLV heritage collection (the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Carribean Studies). The crowdsourcing project is aimed to start in february.

You can already browse these maps through our KITLV Digital Image Library

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